Cultural Travel to the Cradle of Tibetan Civilization

Tibet holds more than very high peaks and valleys. Its rich history and traditions could be a lifetime of study. Cultural travel to the Yarlung Valley in Tibet means traveling to the cradle of Tibetan Civilization. The Yarlung Valley is only 45 miles long, but it is rich with stupas, monasteries, temples and meditation caves.  The lower Yarlung valley has the Sheldrak caves, each with their own stories and history. The “Hill of Divine Descent” called Lhabab Ri, is one of three hilltops in the lower valley where the first king was said to have descended from the heavens on a sky cord. The upper valley has Podrang village, the oldest village in Tibet, and the Yabzang Monastery, and the Chode Gong temple. This cradle of Tibetan Civilization has so much history and story and there is a wonderful 10 day Trek through this valley that is being offered by a Tibetan travel agency:

Explore Tibet, a Lhasa-based, Tibetan-owned Tibet travel agency, announced a new Tibetan trek from Ganden Monastery to the Yarlung Valley and the ancient Samye Monastery. “For travelers looking for a rugged wilderness adventure, this 10-day trek will take them through some of the most beautiful landscape in Tibet,” the agency said. “In addition, the Yarlung Valley and the Samye Monastery are two of the most important sites in Tibetan religious and cultural history. The Yarlung Valley is called the cradle of Tibetan civilization.”

Yarlung Valley Tibet

Yarlung Valley Tibet- photo by reurinkjan

 

Cultural travel to the cradle of Tibetan Civilization is a trip to plan for. If you plan to join the trek through the valley, it is good to prepare your lungs and your body for the high altitude in Tibet. Read the full article in Seattle PI here.

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